COMPLETE COURSE BUSN427 COMPLETE COURSE
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Thursday, 5 November 2015

COMPLETE COURSE BUSN427 COMPLETE COURSE

BUSN 427COMPLETE COURSE BUSN427 COMPLETE COURSE

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BUSN427 Course Project 1 - Burlington Coat Factory

This project consists of creating a Global Business 
Plan using the guidelines document linked below. The plan will be developed in 
groups of three to five students defined by your instructor (groups will be set 
up as soon as possible in Week 1). Each group will select a country to research 
and establish the viability of that country for global expansion. Each group 
will discuss (post) in their respective Group Discussion area which country they 
plan to research and why they chose that country from the list of options 

provided by the instructor via an announcement. One team member (selected by the 
group) will post their country selection and why it was chosen to the Group's Doc Sharing area by the end of Week 1 (via a Word 
document). Note that ONLY the Week 1 deliverable is submitted in this 
fashion.

BUSN 427 Course Project 2 - Starbucks Entry into India

This project consists of creating a Global Business 
Plan using the guidelines document linked below. The plan will be developed in 
groups of three to five students defined by your instructor (groups will be set 
up as soon as possible in Week 1). Each group will select a country to research 
and establish the viability of that country for global expansion. Each group 
will discuss (post) in their respective Group Discussion area which country they 
plan to research and why they chose that country from the list of options 
provided by the instructor via an announcement. One team member (selected by the 
group) will post their country selection and why it was chosen to the Group's Doc Sharing area by the end of Week 1 (via a Word 
document). Note that ONLY the Week 1 deliverable is submitted in this 
fashion.

BUSN 427 All 7 Weeks Discussions

w1 dq1 - Identifying Global Business Opportunities
w1 dq2 - Differences in Political Economy and Culture
w2 dq1 - Ethics in International Business
w2 dq2 - Theory and Political Economy in International Trade
w3 dq1 - FDI and Political Ideology
w3 dq2 - Regional Economic Integration
w4 dq1 - Foreign Exchange Markets—PPP
w4 dq2 - The International Monetary System—IMF
w5 dq1 - Strategies of International Business
w5 dq2 - Entering Foreign Markets
w6 dq1 - Exporting, Importing, and Countertrade
w6 dq2 - Global Production, Outsourcing, and Logistics
w7 dq1 - Global Marketing and R & D
w7 dq2 - Global Human Resource Management

BUSN 427 Week 8 Final

(TCO 1) Which are factors that move the world toward more globalization?
(TCO 2) What is the difference between communists and social democrats?
(TCO 3) What is probably more important than culture in explaining the differences in economic growth between countries?
(TCO 3) Which theory deals with competitive advantage for countries?
(TCO 4) FDI tends to flow
(TCO 5) Which of the following is not a member of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperative?
(TCO 6) What common good is used in most nations to create an index for measuring purchase power parity in various nations?
(TCO 8) What are the various types of countertrade available?
(TCO 8) In distribution strategy, what are the four main differences between countries?
(TCO 3) When McDonald’s initially entered China, it was confident that its success in other parts of the world would facilitate its success in China, but they quickly found out that the relationships and connections implied by guanxi are an essential to business success in China. McDonald’s lost an attractive store location near Tiananmen Square to a Hong Kong developer who, thanks to relationships and connections developed over the years, was able to persuade city officials to overlook the lease McDonald’s held for the property.

Explain the concept of guanxi. Why is it so important to businesses operating in China? How did McDonald’s lack of guanxi raise its costs of doing business in China?
(TCO 3) In 2006, two Chinese journalists reported that the working conditions at Hongfujin Precision Industries where Apple’s iPods are produced were substandard. According to the report, not only were workers at the plant poorly paid, but they were also forced to work overtime. Apple immediately responded to the allegations and audited the factory in question. However, managers at the factory filed a defamation lawsuit against the two journalists. Despite the fact that Apple’s audit did indeed show substandard working conditions at the factory, Hongfujin did not withdraw the lawsuit. Eventually the Reporters Without Borders group took up the case for the two reporters and the lawsuit was dropped.


Should Apple be responsible for ensuring that its suppliers are safeguarding the basic rights and dignity of its employees? How can Apple be sure that its suppliers do not employ sweatshop labor?
(TCO 3) Exports are largely responsible for China’s recent rapid economic growth. The country, capitalizing on its cheap labor force, has focused on converting raw materials into products that are exported to developed countries such as the United States. In 2008, China’s trade surplus was a record $280 billion, and its holdings of foreign exchange reserves were over $1.95 trillion. Some critics have suggested that China is following a neomercantilist policy.
Are the claims that China is following a neomercantilist policy valid? Why or why not?
(TCO 4) For years, Japan has been relatively closed to significant foreign direct investment, but more recently the government has changed its policy and actually now encourages inward investment. Wal-Mart, taking advantage of this shift in policy, acquired a large Japanese retailer in 2002. Wal-Mart’s initial venture into Japan has been challenging and has forced the company to change its approach to better compete with local retailers and meet the needs of Japanese consumers. 

Why did Japan change its position on inward foreign direct investment? How will Wal-Mart’s investment benefit Japan?
(TCO 7) Which of the following are true about the International Monetary Fund?
(TCO 5) Concerning European Union’s progress toward creating a single financial market, the quest started in 1999 was to have been completed by 2005, however, progress has been slowed by various factors related to the tradition of each member country operating autonomously. By 2007, significant progress had been made. Some 41 measures designed to create a single market were in place and others were in the pipeline. The current issue facing the EU revolves around the enforcement of the rules that have been established as law. Some experts believe that it will be at least another decade before the benefits of the new rules become apparent. Discussion of this feature can begin with the following questions.
What are the benefits of creating a single financial market in the European Union for companies? Does it make sense for consumers?
(TCO 6) In the 1980s, Caterpillar was negatively affected by a strong dollar and lost significant market share to Japanese competitor Komatsu. The situation prompted Caterpillar to revise its global strategy and by the 2000s, the company was in a much better position to deal with volatile currency values. More recently, a strong dollar has actually helped boost Caterpillar’s bottom line.

In the 1980s, a stronger dollar hurt Caterpillar’s competitive position, but in 2008 a stronger dollar did not seem to have the same effect. What had changed?
(TCO 7) After joining the European Union in 2004, Latvia established a currency board system that pegged the value of its currency to the euro. This system came under significant pressure when the effects of the financial crisis that began in the United States in 2008 spilled over into the country. Latvia was eventually forced to ask the International Monetary Fund and the European Union for assistance in order to get its financial system and economy back on track. As part of the assistance package, Latvia was required to make significant changes in its economic policy.

Why did the initial effort by Latvia’s government to stabilize the country’s currency fail? Was the government attempting to stop a banking crisis or a foreign debt crisis?
(TCO 8) Vellus Products is a small company that produces personal care products for dogs. Vellus Products initially began exporting when a Taiwanese business placed an order for its dog shampoo. Since then, Vellus Products has expanded its export business and today, international sales account for about half its total sales. Vellus Products now sells in 28 countries around the world. 

Can other small companies learn from the experiences of Vellus Products? Reflect on the tips of Vellus Products’ founder Sharon Doherty for beginning the export process.
(TCO 8) By 2012, India is expected to export half a million vehicles a year. South Korea’s Hyundai is leading the charge, exporting over one third of its Indian production. Suzuki and Nissan have both entered the Indian market more recently. Both companies see the Indian market as an important component in their future production and marketing strategies. 
Why did Hyundai and other global automakers choose India as a production location? What makes India attractive to auto producers?
(TCO 8) Microsoft is meeting the challenges of expanding into the potentially lucrative Indian market, a market where currently most people cannot afford a computer nor the Microsoft programs to run it. Microsoft has changed its highly standardized approach to markets to develop products specifically designed to meet the needs of the Indian market. In addition, the company has established local R & D operations that it hopes will generate new products for the market.
How does Microsoft vary the marketing mix of its existing product offerings to gain traction with Indian customers? What else has Microsoft done to make headway in India?

BUSN 427 Week 8 Final Exam

1. Question :
(TCO 1) What organization was protested in Seattle in 1999?
Student Answer:
Boeing Corporation
Starbucks
World Trade Organization
APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Corporation)
Comments:
2.
Question :
(TCO 2) According to Francis Fukuyama, the collapse of communism in eastern Europe was followed by which of the following?
Student Answer:
The new world order
The end of history
The universalization of Western democracy
None of the above
All of the above
Comments:
3.
Question :
(TCO 3) Which language is most widely spoken throughout the world?
Student Answer:
Chinese
Hindi
English
Spanish
None of the above
Comments:
4.
Question :
(TCO 3) Which theory deals with competitive advantage for countries?
Student Answer:
Herckscher-Ohlin
Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations
Product Life-Cycle Theory
The Leontief Paradox
None of the above
Comments:
5.
Question :
(TCO 4) In the last 30 years, the world economy has seen
Student Answer:
a marked increase in both the flow and stock of FDI.
a slowing of FDI overall.
FDI grow but more slowly than world trade.
a shift away from free-market economies.
Comments:
6.
Question :
(TCO 5) Chile is included in which of the following regional integrations organizations?
Student Answer:
MERCCOSUR
Andean Community
NAFTA
APEC
None of the above
Comments:
7.
Question :
(TCO 6) When a firm engages in hedging it is
Student Answer:
ensuring against a risk in the foreign exchange.
violating a law on foreign speculations.
in danger of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.
investing in a hedge fund to maximize its return to shareholders.
1.
Question :
(TCO 8) What are the three staffing policies available to a multinational corporation?
2.
Question :
(TCO 8) In distribution strategy, what are the four main differences between countries?
3.
Question :
(TCO 3) India’s caste system has been around for many years. Explain why its influence has diminished among educated urban middle class Indians.
4.
Question :
(TCO 3) In 2006, two Chinese journalists reported that the working conditions at Hongfujin Precision Industries where Apple’s iPods are produced were substandard. According to the report, not only were workers at the plant poorly paid, but they were also forced to work overtime. Apple immediately responded to the allegations and audited the factory in question. However, managers at the factory filed a defamation lawsuit against the two journalists. Despite the fact that Apple’s audit did indeed show substandard working conditions at the factory, Hongfujin did not withdraw the lawsuit. Eventually the Reporters Without Borders group took up the case for the two reporters and the lawsuit was dropped.

The allegations against Hongfujin Precision Industries were made by two Chinese reporters. Discuss the implications of this for other Chinese companies.
5.
Question :
(TCO 3) Exports are largely responsible for China’s recent rapid economic growth. The country, capitalizing on its cheap labor force, has focused on converting raw materials into products that are exported to developed countries such as the United States. In 2008, China’s trade surplus was a record $280 billion, and its holdings of foreign exchange reserves were over $1.95 trillion. Some critics have suggested that China is following a neomercantilist policy.

Are the claims that China is following a neomercantilist policy valid? Why or why not?
6.
Question :
(TCO 4) Telefonica is a Spanish telecommunications firm. For decades, Telefonica had operated as a typical state-owned enterprise, but privatization and deregulation changed that path in the 1990s. Telefonica began to aggressively pursue expansion opportunities in Latin America where it quickly became the number one or two player in nearly every country. Later, Telefonica turned its sights on Europe where its acquisitions helped transform the company into the second biggest mobile phone operator in the world. 

What changes in political and economic environment allowed Telefoncia to start expanding globally? Why did Telefonica initially focus on Latin America? Why was it slower to expand in Europe even though Spain is a member of the European Union?
7.
Question :
(TCO 7) Why did the world shift from a gold standard to fixed exchange rates?
1.
Question :
(TCO 5) Concerning European Union’s progress toward creating a single financial market, the quest started in 1999 was to have been completed by 2005, however, progress has been slowed by various factors related to the tradition of each member country operating autonomously. By 2007, significant progress had been made. Some 41 measures designed to create a single market were in place and others were in the pipeline. The current issue facing the EU revolves around the enforcement of the rules that have been established as law. Some experts believe that it will be at least another decade before the benefits of the new rules become apparent. Discussion of this feature can begin with the following questions.

What are the benefits of creating a single financial market in the European Union for companies? Does it make sense for consumers?
Comments:
2.
Question :
(TCO 6) In the 1980s, Caterpillar was negatively affected by a strong dollar and lost significant market share to Japanese competitor Komatsu. The situation prompted Caterpillar to revise its global strategy and by the 2000s, the company was in a much better position to deal with volatile currency values. More recently, a strong dollar has actually helped boost Caterpillar’s bottom line.



In the 1980s, a stronger dollar hurt Caterpillar’s competitive position, but in 2008 a stronger dollar did not seem to have the same effect. What had changed?
3.
Question :
(TCO 7) In May 2001, the IMF agreed to lend $8 billion to Turkey to help stabilize its economy and halt a sharp slide in the value of its currency. Although initially the Turkish government resisted IMF mandates on economic policy, in 2003 the government passed an austerity budget. By 2005, significant progress had been made and today, the country appears to be on track for recovery, with lower inflation rates, an increase in privatization, and a budget surplus.

What led to Turkey’s financial crisis? What goals did the IMF establish as part of the loan agreement?
Comments:
4.
Question :
(TCO 8) MD International is an export intermediary for U.S. medical equipment manufacturers. The company has been able to capitalize on falling trade barriers, as well as expand healthcare programs in the Latin American region. MD International currently represents more than 30 companies and sells to some 600 regional distributors. 

How does an intermediary such as MD International create value for the manufacturers who use it to sell medical equipment in foreign markets? Why do they want to use MD International rather than export directly themselves?
5.
Question :
(TCO 8) Boeing made the decision to outsource much of the production of the 787 in the hopes of significantly reducing the time to get the product to market. Boeing also anticipated that its outsourcing strategy would allow it to generate additional sales from the countries that were partners in the process and reduce its costs and risks. Although Boeing’s strategy worked for some components, for other parts the strategy was a disaster. Suppliers were late and some produced poor-quality parts, forcing Boeing to commit additional resources to the project.



What are the benefits to Boeing of outsourcing so much work on the 787 to foreign suppliers? What are the potential risks? Do the benefits outweigh the risks?
Comments:
6.
Question :
(TCO 8) By 2015, Ford hopes to compete in North America, Europe, and Asia by offering several global models including the Fiesta, the Fusion, and the Mondeo. The company, which refers to its new strategy as One Ford, anticipates that its global models will share the same components and looks and be positioned in a similar way in each market in which they are sold.



What is behind Ford’s One Ford vision? What is the company hoping to accomplish with this strategy?

BUSN 427 COMPLETE COURSE BUSN427 COMPLETE COURSE

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